ENVS Brown Bag Series: Jean Melious on Managing Water Resources

As part of the Environmental Studies Department's brown bag discussion series, ENVS Professor Jean Melious will present "Fish Out of Water: Why salmon lose to sprawl" on Monday 4/20 at 4pm in Arntzen Hall 225.

In response to epic drought, farmers in California are mining million-year-old water. Is water use here in evergreen Washington more rational? Over the past few years, Professor Jean Melious has been working with citizens and environmental organizations to implement Washington’s state laws, which appear to link new development to water availability. The reality, however, is far different. This talk will discuss some of the legal, political, and economic issues that make rational stewardship of water resources so difficult, focusing on Whatcom County and Washington and bringing in insights from other areas. Melious will also describe prospects for the future of water management under conditions of climate change.... Read more

Huxley Speaker Series 4/16: Tim Miller on Invasive Wildland Weeds

As part of the 2014-15 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Tim Miller at Washington State University Extension will discuss battling non-native invasive plants at 4 p.m. on Thursday, April 16 in Communications Facility 120 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Introduction and spread of non-native invasive plants are one of the largest threats to ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest. Many of these introductions are so recent that control recommendations have not yet been constructed. Miller, Extension Weed Scientist with Washington State University, has conducted trials on a host of newly introduced, noxious weed species. In a talk titled "Battling Invasive Wildland Weeds:  How We Plan and Conduct Management Trials," he will share the systematic research that must be accomplished before management recommendations can... Read more

Huxley Speaker Series 4/9: Erika McPhee-Shaw on Pacific Coast Ecosystems

As part of the 2014-15 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Shannon Point Marine Center director Dr. Erika McPhee-Shaw will discuss characteristics of coastal ecosystems at 4 p.m. on Thursday, April 9 in Communications Facility 120 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

In lakes and in oceanic water bodies such as the Gulf of Mexico, there can be a relatively clear relationship between land-based agricultural pollution and impaired water quality. However, in some regions of the ocean the causes for low oxygen are less clearly attributable to human activities. This is particularly so along the west coasts of the U.S., where upwelling brings naturally low-oxygen waters up into shallow ecosystems on a regular seasonal basis. In her talk titled, “Life on the Edge of the Pacific,” McPhee-Shaw will discuss a series of... Read more

45th Anniversary of Huxley College: May 16 at Back2Bellingham

Huxley College's 45th Anniversary Celebration will take place at WWU's annual Back2Bellingham reunion weekend on Saturday May 16, 2015. Please join us for a day of Huxley-focused activities, including Classes Without Quizzes led by Huxley College faculty and a Huxley College alumni happy hour and dinner celebration with family, faculty, and students. See the schedule below for more details.

Online registration for the anniversary and reunion celebration is available on the Back2Bellingham website. Updated information will also be available here on the Huxley blog and on our Facebook page, or call the Alumni Association at (855) WWU-ALUM.

Huxley B2B Schedule of Events*

Saturday, May 16, 2015

10:45-11am: Welcome Back address by Huxley College dean, Steve Hollenhorst

... Read more

ENVS Brown Bag Series: Nathan J. Bennett on environmental management and policy

In the inaugural lecture of the Environmental Studies Department's brown bag discussion series, visiting scholar Nathan Bennett will present "Engaging Critical and Constructive Approaches to Environmental Management and Policy."

Scholars studying environmental management and policy often engage either constructive or critical approaches and theory. Yet, scholars from each of these traditions rarely present in the same venues or publish in the same journals and thus often lack awareness of the methods, theories and rationales for engaging the opposite perspective. This absence of a productive conversation between the two groups interferes with the interdisciplinary engagement and knowledge co-production vital for solving complex environmental problems. In this talk, I will reflect on the requirements for engaging both critical and constructive approaches to studying environmental management and policy with reference to my own work on marine... Read more

Huxley Speaker Series 3/12: Chance Asher on Science and Environmental Policy Making

As part of the 2014-15 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Chance Asher from the Washington State Department of Ecology will discuss environmental law and policy at 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 12 in Communications Facility 120 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

As the cornerstones of environmental protection, environmental laws and policies must be scientifically sound, legally defensible, practically implementable, and cost effective. Achieving these varied purposes requires the critical thinking and cooperation of environmental law and policy makers from divergent professions: scientists, lawyers, statisticians, social scientists, and engineers. In her talk titled, “The Critical Role of Science in Environmental Law and Policy Making,” Asher will describe the specific impact of science on the development of effective... Read more

Huxley Speaker Series 3/5: James Conca on Energy Politics

As part of the 2014-15 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, James Conca of UFA Ventures, Inc., will discuss global energy politics at 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 5 in Communications Facility 120. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Global energy consumption, currently estimated at 17 trillion kilowatt hours per year, is projected to grow to well over 30 trillion by mid-century, with most of this growth occurring in developing nations. To attain a sustainable global energy production free of intermittent shortages, security vulnerabilities, environmental degradation, and extreme costs requires the development of a variety of energy sources.

In his talk titled “The GeoPolitics of Energy: Achieving a just and sustainable energy distribution by 2040,” Dr. Conca will discuss a rational global energy strategy that can achieve an ethical and sustainable energy mix in... Read more

Huxley Speaker Series 2/26: David Kaplan on Information Technology for Clean Energy

As part of the 2014-15 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, David Kaplan of 1Energy Systems will speak on the role of information technology in clean energy development at 4 p.m. on Thursday, February 26 in Communications Facility 120. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Falling prices for solar PV, batteries and related resources, make the clean energy transition inevitable. These technologies are the best means of addressing climate change, but also threaten power system reliability by challenging the assumptions on which the grid was designed. During his talk titled "Information Technology for Clean Energy," Kaplan will describe how information technology based on low-cost, high-performance computation and networking--still under-exploited in the power system--is being leveraged to address these problems and fully enable clean energy.

David... Read more

Huxley Speaker Series 2/19: Huxley Alum Julann Spromberg on Mortality Syndrome in Coho Salmon

As part of the 2014-15 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Western alumna Dr. Julann Spromberg, a toxicologist with NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center, will discuss the impact of storm water runoff on Coho salmon at 4 p.m. on Thursday, February 19 in Communications Facility 120. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Adult Coho salmon return each fall to freshwater spawning habitats throughout western North America. The Coho spawner migration coincides with increasing seasonal rainfall, which in turn increases storm water runoff, particularly in urban and suburban watersheds. For more than a decade, adult Coho in urban spawning habitats have been dying prematurely, often at rates exceeding 50% of the fall run. Such high levels of mortality are a significant concern for the long-term conservation and recovery of wild Coho, particularly those population... Read more

Huxley Speaker Series 2/12: Robert Johnston on Pollution Runoff in Puget Sound

As part of the 2014-15 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Western alumnus Dr. Bob Johnston, Senior Scientist with the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, will discuss the monitoring of pollution runoff in a pair of Puget Sound inlets at 4 p.m. on Thursday, February 12 in Communications Facility 120 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

An important need for achieving ecosystem restoration goals is to identify response actions that will make real improvements in environmental quality. A cooperative monitoring and modeling study conducted by the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Washington Department of Ecology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and local stakeholders is bringing new understanding about how pollution runoff is impacting the water quality of Sinclair and Dyes Inlets in the Puget Sound, WA. In his talk... Read more

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