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Tools for Integrating Ecosystem Connectivity Into Planning

Habitat connectivity is essential to maintaining and conserving fish and wildlife species populations and important ecological processes. Species must be able to move to access habitat to feed, breed, seek shelter, migrate, and recover from perturbations. For many species, connectivity is substantially obstructed and fragmented by infrastructure which can result in species population declines and imperilment. Methods to remediate fish and wildlife movement barriers along roadways and other infrastructure have been implemented globally for decades.

Huxley Speaker Series 3/10: Sam Cushman on Landscape Genetics

As part of the 2015-16 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Sam Cushman from the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station will discuss landscape genetics in carnivore conservation at 4 p.m. on Thursday, March 10 in Communications Facility 110 on the Western Washington University campus.

Huxley Speaker Series 2/18: Conservation Northwest's Joe Scott on Wildlife Border Issues

As part of the 2015-16 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Joe Scott from Conservation Northwest will discuss wildlife conservation in the Canada/US border region at 4 p.m. on Thursday, February 18 in Communications Facility 110 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Huxley Speaker Series 2/11: Mitch Friedman on Recovering Washington's Carnivores

As part of the 2015-16 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Mitch Friedman from Conservation Northwest will discuss Washington carnivore populations at 4 p.m. on Thursday, February 11 in Communications Facility 110 on the Western Washington University campus.

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