Guide to Equity, Inclusion, & Diversity Content in Huxley Courses - Fall 2021

Please Note:

  • This page is searchable by word using your browser’s Find or Search function.
  • The classes are sorted by Department in the following order: ENVS, ESCI, ENRG, UEPP
  • Some course numbers do not appear sequentially due to non-numeric characters affecting the sorting.
  • These are not complete course descriptions; please also read the course catalog descriptions – generally every course covers other material as well as what is  mentioned here. Courses are always works in progress so may diverge from what is stated here.
  • Restrictions and Prerequisites apply.
  • These submissions are voluntary by faculty –and not all responded, so this is not a complete list of courses dealing with such content.
  • Faculty gave description in their own words, so there is no single voice in how the classes are described.
  • Some courses are taught in different ways by different faculty in different quarters or locations – so all are included as they stated it.
  • Scheduled quarters shown subject to change. Future years have not been scheduled yet.

ENVS 110 Ecogastronomy: The Art and Science of Food (2 Cr)

Gigi Berardi

Summer, not teaching it in 2021-22 but expect to in future

The course, as of now, is heavier on E-SJ than EID. Will include a module on DEI in winter 2021—readings, videos, discussion, BLM Working Group facilitators and others representing diverse histories/contexts/cultures/economic and social realities.  The textbook is written by a gay man living with AIDs, and we discuss his cultural constructions, contexts, realities. Themes of course include Good, Clean, Fair food. Heavy emphasis on Fair. A premise is that US food systems are headed towards disaster—resilience is poor due to unacceptable high levels of economically vulnerable, at-risk populations.

 

ENVS 116 Sustainability Literacy (3 Cr)

Grace Wang

Winter

The course is centered around the UN Sustainable Development Goals...all of them, which include a class session and readings on no poverty, zero hunger and gender equality.

 

ENVS 116 Sustainable Literacy 1 (3 Cr)

Jill MacIntyre Witt

Winter

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are taught with a focus in the social justice context for each SDG and how each goal can have a positive difference at the local to global level, with focus on the most vulnerable countries. Teachings include case studies, action items and curriculum connections in relation to human rights, oppression, Indigenous peoples, gender politics and more.

 

ENVS 202 Introduction to Env. Studies and Sustainability (3 Cr)

Jill MacIntyre Witt

Fall, Spring

The course theme is climate justice in regards to understanding concepts of sustainability. Climate justice explores the intersections between social, racial, environmental and economic justice in relation to environmental destruction and movement building. This climate justice course lens is also applied to sustainable solutions with a closer look at a just transition in regards to addressing carbon pollution, transforming our food system, consumer culture and cities.

 

ENVS 204 Human Geography (4 Cr)

Dave Rossiter

Winter

This course is a broad survey of the discipline of Human Geography. Historically, such courses have been criticized for being a sort of tour of the world from a Euro-centric point of view. This course avoids that approach and instead encourages students to think geographically -- to center place, space, and environment -- in approaching a globalized world. A particular emphasis is placed on the political geographies that have produced inequity at both the micro and macro scale.

 

ENVS 303 Introduction to Environmental Studies 1: Human Ecology and Ethics (5 Cr)

Kate Darby

not teaching it in 2021-22 but expect to in future

Diversity & co-constitution of culture- nature relationships; critique/dismantling of dominant environmental narratives from race, class, disablist, feminist & queer perspectives, and how these aspects of identity affect perceptions of and experiences in nature. American Indian / Indigenous experience during colonization, re-location, assimilation, termination, and self-determination /cultural resurgence eras. Env ethics including env. justice and origins of eco-social injustice in broad systems of oppression. Essay 4: choose 2 from diverse lists of env hero/heroines for biographies. Case study of cultures & ecological change over time in Island County.  Above topics are not treated beyond an introductory level. ENVS 303 evolves but content, readings & assignments are very similar across faculty who teach it.

 

ENVS 303 Intro to Enviro Studies I: Human Ecology and Ethics (5 Cr)

Rebekah Paci-Green

Winter

Diversity & co-constitution of culture- nature relationships; critique/dismantling of dominant environmental narratives from race, class, disablist, feminist & queer perspectives, and how these aspects of identity affect perceptions of and experiences in nature. American Indian / Indigenous experience during colonization, re-location, assimilation, termination, and self-determination /cultural resurgence eras. Env ethics including env. justice and origins of eco-social injustice in broad systems of oppression. Essay 4: choose 2 from diverse lists of env hero/heroines for biographies. Case study of cultures & ecological change over time in Island County.  Above topics are not treated beyond an introductory level. ENVS 303 evolves but content, readings & assignments are very similar across faculty who teach it.

 

ENVS 303 Intro to Env. Studies: Human Ecology and Ethics (5 Cr)

Gene Myers

not teaching in 2021-22 but expect to in future

Diversity & co-constitution of culture- nature relationships; critique/dismantling of dominant environmental narratives from race, class, disablist, feminist & queer perspectives, and how these aspects of identity affect perceptions of and experiences in nature. American Indian / Indigenous experience during colonization, re-location, assimilation, termination, and self-determination /cultural resurgence eras. Env ethics including env. justice and origins of eco-social injustice in broad systems of oppression. Essay 4: choose 2 from diverse lists of env hero/heroines for biographies. Case study of cultures & ecological change over time in Island County.  Above topics are not treated beyond an introductory level. ENVS 303 evolves but content, readings & assignments are very similar across faculty who teach it.

 

ENVS 305 Environmental Studies II: Policy & History (5 Cr)

Troy D. Abel

Winter

Challenges student to remember the upcoming holiday for Dr. Martin Luther King. The big idea: Dr. King was assassinated fighting environmental racism:  EPA’s environmental justice timeline starts on February 11, 1968 -- the beginning of the Memphis Sanitation Strike. This was first time African Americans had mobilized a national, broad-based group to oppose what they considered environmental injustices. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. investigated an environmental injustice incident and advocated for better working conditions and pay for striking Memphis, Tennessee, garbage workers. Two months later, King was assassinated on April 4 at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. Also in this course: reading a chapter on Tribal Sovereignty and and challenging students to reimagine Ken Burns's National Park film documentary as America's Worst Idea. Possibe BIPOC guest speaker from Seattle's Office of Sustainability to discuss the city's outreach and investments in the city's EJ communities.

 

ENVS 319 Research and Writing (3 Cr)

Dave Rossiter

Spring

This course on research and writing introduces students to select critical social theories commonly used in analyzing issues of EID/E-SJ in Environmental Studies. These include Marxist, Feminist, and anti-colonial approaches. In the main writing assignment, students will have the opportunity to explore such approaches in some depth.

 

ENVS 319 Research and Writing (3 Cr)

Gigi Berardi

not teaching it in 2021-22 but expect to in future

The course, as of now, is heavier on EID than E-SJ.  Will include a module on DEI in winter 2021—readings, videos, discussion, BLM Working Group facilitators and others representing diverse histories/contexts/cultures/economic and social realities.  Readings include critical concepts of exploitation, colonialism.

 

ENVS 331 Canada: Society and Environment (4 Cr)

Dave Rossiter

Winter

This course is about the construction of a settler political entity (Canada). It explores the ways in which human geographies imported from Europe (and beyond) were brought to Turtle Island and imposed on a landscape that was already organized by Indigenous polities. It considers both the historical geographies of dispossession underpinning the nation state of Canada and current possibilities for reconciliation and/or Indigenous resurgence.

 

ENVS 359 Business and Sustainability Principles and Practice (4 Cr)

Gigi Berardi

Fall

The course, as of now, is heavier on E-SJ than EID, hence the 4, an average. Please note that I co-teach the course with Craig Dunn. So, I added a module on DEI in fall 2020—readings, videos, discussion, BLM Working Group facilitators and others representing diverse histories/contexts/cultures/economic and social realities.  In a resources management module, there are readings focused on Native American, and Alaska Native resource appropriation.

 

ENVS 362 US Disaster Policy (4 Cr)

Rebekah Paci-Green

Fall

One of two books and several films explore the purposeful and differential impact of disaster policy on marginalized groups in the US. Discussions often center on how systemic racism, classism and regionalism become embedded in disaster policy, with clear higher impacts to BIPOC and poor communities. 

 

ENVS 372 Natural Hazards Planning (5 Cr)

Rebekah Paci-Green

Fall

Occasional discussion of how natural hazard mitigation can be used as a tool for addressing social justice goals

 

ENVS 381 Intro to Education for Env. and Sustainability (4 Cr)

Gene Myers, Nini Hayes, Nick Stanger (one or more)

Fall

Survey of what and why of field of env ed; critical re-appraisal of traditional agendas; examination of social positionality in education; explores learner-centered & liberatory syntheses of education for ecological justice and social justice.

 

ENVS 410 Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture (4 Cr)

Gigi Berardi

Summer, not teaching it in 2021-22 but expect to in future

The course, as of now, is heavier on E-SJ than EID. Will include a module on DEI in spring 2022—readings, videos, discussion, BLM Working Group facilitators and others representing diverse histories/contexts/cultures/economic and social realities.  A premise, developed first in 110, is that US food systems are headed towards disaster—resilience is poor due to unacceptable high levels of economically vulnerable, at-risk populations. Readings focus on vulnerabilities.

 

ENVS 412 Environmental Journalism (4 Cr)

Warren Cornwall

Winter

Beginning in winter 2021, the course included more discussions and material related to antiracist journalism and how to practice it. That included readings and videos of leading journalists of color discussing ways to practice journalism that more effectively covers communities of color and incorporates the voices of people of color into news stories. Students were provided resources to better find and interview a diverse range of people from different communities. Class discussions explored ways in which journalism can better represent the voices of people who have been overlooked or marginalized in news coverage of the environment. Efforts were made in this quarter, and will be made in future years, to ensure guest speakers include environmental journalists of color.

 

ENVS 413 The Planet (4 Cr)

Warren Cornwall

Fall, Winter, Spring

The course trains reporters to report and tell stories about environmental issues, to be published in The Planet magazine. Beginning in the fall 2020 quarter, the course began to include more content specifically about how to practice antiracist journalism and improve representation of people of color and people from other backgrounds that have historically been marginalized or underrepresented in news coverage of environmental issues. That included development of a Planet Magazine statement committing itself to a series of concrete steps to improve the representation of people of color in the editing staff, reporting staff, selection of news stories and sources represented in those stories. Students are introduced to techniques to find, report and tell stories that explore issues of importance to communities of color and that represent the voices of people of color.

I have also increased efforts to ensure representation of journalists of color as guest speakers.E17

 

ENVS 444 Colonial Landscapes in the PNW (4 Cr)

Dave Rossiter

Spring

This is a course about the historical geographies of settler colonialism in the PNW. We deconstruct the production of colonized landscapes (physical, cultural, political) to better understand their how they became entrenched and how they might be overcome.

 

ENVS 450 Science in the Policy Process (4 Cr)

Mark Neff

not teaching it in 2021-22 but expect to in future

Explore science and expertise as a form of power that has contributed to and/or justified historical and contemporary inequities.

 

ENVS 450 Science in the Policy Process (4 Cr)

Troy D. Abel

Winter

Deliberative engagement with this social justice challenge; view two online videos that discuss EJ from two of the most popular information platforms in recent times—TEDx and The Daily Show. Lectures introducing two voices from my South Seattle research on the sharp edge of environmental injustice in one of the supposedly most sustainable cities in North America.

Examples that show nvironmental racism is not some abstract and academic concept:

John (pseudonym to protect their identity) participated in my facilitated group mapping project in 2014 where I asked participants to describe one air pollution experience they or their family had faced. He recounted smelling and tasting metallic emissions while his adolescent son practiced soccer in one of the city’s parks.

In the Surrounded by Industry visual journalism story, Kelly recounts her fears that her son could contract asthma from the air pollution in South Seattle, but she explains why it’s not economically feasible for the family to follow their doctor’s advice and move.

Also, I plan on hosting the Executive Director of the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition for a session where they share their perspectives on fighting for EJ in a city most see as a leader in sustainability and environmental protection.

 

ENVS 454 Environmental Policy Analysis (4 Cr)

Troy D. Abel

Fall

Students do a normative assessment of their professional futures in response to three questions:

Who does an environmental professional serve?

Who has and who should have influence in a democracy?

Is the role of an environmental professional purely about providing information and recommendations or to educate stakeholders and the public?

Introduce a continuum of community engagement in research, spanning research on communities, plus outreach; community activist-initiated research relationships; to community action, and beyond. I illustrate this  by my research on Seattle's Segregating Riskscape. We were successful and I describe the third step in my progression along the collaboration continuum above by introducing my students to the Duwamish Community Action for Clean Air Project.

 

ENVS 457 Environmental Dispute Resolution (4 Cr)

Sheri Russell

Fall, Winter, Spring

This course incorporates EID/E-SJ in course readings, discussions, simulated negotiations and a final research paper.  We have readings and units specifically on EJ; the roles of power, values & trust; and implicit and cultural bias.  The simulated negotiations include issues of land use with parties of differing levels of power, including traditionally underrepresented parties.  The final research paper and 2-day negotiation address homelessness in Bellingham.  Students research a specific party's role in this social and environmental justice crisis, prepare an 8-10 page research and analysis paper for their party's confidential information, and then represent that party in a 2-day negotiation.

 

ENVS 461 Land Use Law (4 Cr)

Sheri Russell

Fall, Winter

This course includes E-SJ issues in several of the US Supreme Court cases regarding how the Court has interpreted the definitions of family, blighted neighborhoods, aesthetic value and public use in its holdings in several zoning, due process, equal protection, and takings cases.  Students read and discuss the laws at issue, the Court's rationale and rulings, and the effects of these holdings.

 

ENVS 465 Disaster Risk Reduction (4 Cr)

Rebekah Paci-Green

Winter

Readings, films, assignments all consider the mechanisms of oppression manifest in heightened vulnerability to disasters; assignments consider strategies for disaster risk reduction through social justice 

 

ENVS 471 Campus Sustainability Planning Studio (3 Cr)

Jill MacIntyre Witt

Fall, Spring

ENVS 471 is a project based course focused on helping to move the campus Sustainability Action Plan forward. The curriculum focuses on project management in the context of driving sustainable solutions which includes the social justice components of sustainability. This course also involves a systems thinking approach to looking at the solutions towards institutional changes, pushing against the status quo in regards to the power structures and systems of oppression and works to drive changes to impact current injustices.

 

ENVS 476 Emergency Planning and Disaster Reduction Studio (4 Cr)

Rebekah Paci-Green

Spring

Community projects, so EID/E-SJ varies with the year and the project. This year working with Swinomish Indian Tribal Community on climate change adaptation plan. Readings and conversations with tribal members expose students to historical and current eco-social injustice in concrete, specific, and in-depth ways. Project directly seeks to support Swinomish in addressing and reducing impacts. 

 

ENVS 483 Environmental Interpretation (4 Cr)

Gene Myers

Fall

Relevant aspects include NPS Audience Centered Interpretation model. For future offerings: help students explore and gain clarity on issues around knowledge rights, representation, and cultural difference in interpretation.

 

ENVS 487 Conservation Psychology (4 Cr)

Gene Myers

Winter

Relation to EID/E-SJ is around understanding psychology of socialization, empathy, moral psychology, power, self-determination, psychological biases, etc. Cultural variation in cognition / knowledge systems about 'environment' & nature considered. Some options for book groups focus on specific cases of env. injustice and multi-leveled analyses of them. These comprise only part of course.

 

ENVS 491 Environmental Communication (5 Cr)

Nick Stanger, Gene Myers, Nini Hayes or other staff

Spring

ENVS 491 is an interdisciplinary applied capstone course that focuses on environmental communication including through an eco-social justice lens. Working with community partner groups or agencies, students work in groups to serve their needs, usually including a media communication component.  Depending on the individual faculty member, emphases may include community-based education, youth activism collaboration and empowerment, story telling, multicultural education, values-based communication, cultural safety and relevance.

 

ENVS 492 Curriculum for Environment and Sustainability (4 Cr)

Nick Stanger

Winter

This course works on cultural sensitivity training as it relates to environmental education, anti-racist pedagogies, and Indigenous ways of knowing particularly around its partnership with outside organizations/schools, learning through the Since Time Immemorial curriculum, and development of curriculum that is appropriate for students from diverse backgrounds.

 

ENVS 501 Research and Projects in Environmental Studies (3 Cr)

Gigi Berardi

Fall

Includes a module on DEI in fall 2020—readings, videos, discussion.  In a critical readings module, grammars of colonialism readings.

 

ENVS 397C Mountain Geography (4 Cr)

Andrew Bach

Fall

Little discussion of indigenous groups managing resources

 

ENVS 397p Spatial Knowledge (3 Cr)

James Miller

Winter

Topics include anti-colonialism, decolonization, Indigenizing

 

ENVS 467/567 Power, Privilege, and the Environment (4 Cr)

Kate Darby

Spring

Units include: Representation and Identity (in mainstream enviro efforts and SJ efforts tackling the env't), Spatial environmental injustice, knowledge and lived experiences, root causes and radical alternatives, last unit changes based on chosen text (this year = Julie Sze's Environmental Justice in a Moment of Danger)

 

ENVS 485, 486, 488, 489 Spring Block (courses have distinct titles) (17 Cr)

Gene Myers, Nick Stanger, Nini Hayes, other staff

Spring

Students design and deliver Env-Social Justice. Education lessons / programming for each other, learners from a partner school, and/ or community organizations that support urban, Indigenous, homeless, and other marginalized populations with particular emphasis on cultural safety, relevancy, liberation and agency. We work on  Env. Ed. praxis around Land Education springing from Decolonizing / Indigenizing critiques and pedagogies. Community partners benefit diverse / historically oppressed populations.  Students engage in critical examination of dominant identities / roles and relations to nature/ env. and noticing power / environmental agency  in other groups' discourses and action.   (These courses are called Spring Block (SB) spring program: four  env. ed.-related courses taken concurrently by same community of students: ENVS 485, 486, 488, & 489. Students must have taken ENVS 381 (492 highly recommended) and apply for the SB program in the fall and take winter 1-credit planning seminar.)

 

 

ENVS 497D International Business and Food Sustainability (4 Cr)

Gigi Berardi

Summer

The course is a mix of E-SJ and EID. Will include a module on DEI—readings, videos, discussion. A premise is that international food and business systems are headed towards disaster—resilience is poor due to unacceptable high levels of the economically vulnerable. A major threat to resilience is labor (from college students to farm workers in south India), exploited and at-risk in dozens of ways, systems will unravel without a thriving labor force. Also considers important factors in vulnerability, such as pandemics. Many readings point towards these themes of equity, inclusion, personal sustainability.

 

ENVS 497X Methods in Environmental Education (4 Cr)

Nick Stanger

Winter

Critical Methodologies -  using Indigenous, community based research that takes into account other forms of ethics and ways of knowing. Readings from diverse backgrounds and authors (LGBTQ2+, BIPOC, and other historically marginalized authors)

 

ENVS 498b Internship (6 Cr)

Troy D. Abel

Spring, Summer

I received one of the Provost's Social Justice and Equity Committee (SJEC) awards to fund a BIPOC student's involvement in my ongoing EJ work in South Seattle. We titled this effort as Interdisciplinary Mentoring for Environmental Justice and dedicated all of the $6k to paying the BIPOC student for 180 hours needed to earn the six 498 credits. 

 

ENVS 498c Senior Project (variable Cr)

Troy D. Abel

Spring

A sample Environmental justice senior project report is disseminated as a model write-up for the 498 reporting requirement.

 

ENVS 498C Senior Project (2 Cr)

Troy D. Abel

Fall

One of our required texts is Medin, Douglas and Megan Bang. 2014. Who’s asking: native science, western science, and science education. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. In the syllabus, I offer this lengthy learning objective statement.

We will discuss scientific and epistemological pluralism demonstrated by Medin and Bang’s research contrasting rural white views of nature in rural Wisconsin versus their Menominee Tribal neighbors. I imagine many of you saw this statement somewhere in our university’s communications. We acknowledge with respect to the Coast Salish peoples on whose traditional territory Huxley College stands, and to the Lummi and Nooksack peoples whose historical relationships with the land continue to this day. But, I’m challenging you to go farther than just reciting those words or others like them to try and demonstrate that your woke. This book will help you begin to recognize the alternative cultural and epistemological views of our neighboring Tribal communities.

You will also learn that environmental sciences are not acultural, neutral, or objective. They reflect European-American and Western values and worldviews. Learning the alternative cultural views of our Native American neighbors is an important first step in acknowledging with respect. Perhaps, you will go farther by learning about Coast Salish and Makah Tribal community traditions, stories, and Indigenous Knowledge Systems related to your 498 work. Then, you can recognize them and integrate them into your future writings and work.

 

 

ENVS 499/599 Readings in Environmental Justice (1 Cr)

Kate Darby

Fall, Spring

Topics change based on selected text(s), but always has EJ/SJ focus (recent books: Washington's A Terrible Thing to Waste, Tsing's Mushroom at the End of the World, Ray's A Field Guide to Climate Anxiety

 

ESCI 321 Oceanography (4 Cr)

David Shull

Fall

I discuss a female scientist who made important oceanographic discoveries but whose work was underappreciated at the time.

 

ESCI 330 Natural History of PNW (4 Cr)

John McLaughlin

Fall

Indigenous roles/relationships/perspectives in PNW environments; Indigenous baselines in PNW environments

 

ESCI 340 Biostatistical Analysis (5 Cr)

Angela Strecker

Spring

I am working on a module that would center around racism in statistics (originally developed by Dan Pollard, another 340 instructor in Biology), with historical context (background readings, etc), and using a case study and data from the Flint, MI drinking water crisis.  As this is only the second time I’ve taught this class, I’m not sure if it will be done this year (trying to get there, but running out of time), but it definitely will be ready next year.

 

ESCI 340 Biostats (5 Cr)

Alia Khan

not teaching it in 2021-22 but expect to in future

This year I used a lot of Covid data for the R labs and incorporated readings and discussions on the need for equal representation of people from differing ethnicities in vaccine trials, additionally, why BIPOC and particularly black and indigenous people are hesitant to volunteer for vaccine trials, due to historic exploitation (such as the Tuskegee Syphilis study and Henrietta Lacks) that has developed distrust in black and indigenous people.

 

ESCI 393 Our Coastal Seas and Climate Change ( Cr)

Erika McPhee-Shaw

Fall, Spring

I encourage a global view of oceanography and climate change, and students learn and teach each other early on about various current systems of the planet. Later in the quarter they revisit those global systems, giving short presentations with a learning-objective-focus on short research and good communication and presentation skills. Because I ask that the distribution of topics to be geographically diverse, at least 2/3 of the students focus on a region of the world in a developing nation and learn about people living in coastal systems far from the issues we usually hear about in the United States. Each student teaches everyone else in the class  in a ~ 20 minute talk, so everyone shares their knowledge, and we all learn a great deal about climate change challenges around the world, as well as various solutions people are coming up with.  It is important that students know, however, that this learning happens mostly in the last 1 to 2 weeks, and that they need the pre-req oceanography course to feel comfortable dealing with the scientific literature and understanding of ocean circulation we use - we think about how ocean heating affects planetary atmosphere/ocean circulation, ice melt, sea level rise,  storms, etc, and therefore much of this course is focused on mechanics and dynamics, not about economics, society, etc.

 

ESCI 409 Riparian Conservation (4 Cr)

John McLaughlin

Spring

Relationships of diverse peoples with rivers; Indigenous roles/relationships/interests/perspectives/values in rivers and riparian systems; Indigenous approaches to restoration

 

ESCI 410 Habitat and Ecology of Pacific Salmon and Trout (3 Cr)

Jim Helfield

Winter, Spring

The course is mostly focused on fish biology, but some lectures address issues related to Northwest Indian Tribes’ treaty rights and co-management of salmon fisheries.

 

ESCI 431 Watershed Biogeochemistry (5 Cr)

Alia Khan

Spring

Capstone course where students can choose a watershed biogeochemistry topic thus it is partially up to the student what they choose to base their project on.  We discuss the impacts of climate change on the hydrology and biogeochemistry of watersheds and use the Nooksack River as an example. Thus, we discuss the impacts on the Nooksack and Lummi Tribes and I bring in guest lecturers where possible from the tribes and local water quality monitoring organizations, such as the Whatcom Conservation District where they can also speak to the role of farming and agriculture and the impacts on downstream water quality for the Lummi Tribe.

 

ESCI 432 Topics in Marine Ecology (4 Cr)

David Shull

Winter

I pick authors from a variety of backgrounds including one trans-sexual. We briefly discuss the authors of the papers we read in class, not making a big deal about their backgrounds but I let the students know about them.

 

ESCI 439 Conservation of Biological Diversity (4 Cr)

John McLaughlin

Fall

Disproportionate impacts of biodiversity loss; voices/writings/experiences of underrepresented identities; Indigenous roles, relationships, approaches

 

ESCI 464 Sustainable Building Analysis and Design (4 Cr)

Froylan Sifuentes

Winter

Introduce indigenous design into discussion of sustainable architectural choices.

 

ESCI 491 Oceanography of the Salish Sea (4, may be 5 in future Cr)

Erika McPhee-Shaw

Winter

We read the autobiography 'Tulalip from my Heart - an Autobiographical Account of a Reservation Community' by Harriette Shelton Dover, with SLO focused around history and sense of place from people who lived in region and families who were decision makers (her father was one of the folks who signed the treaty). Students have a reading assignment, but I don't do much teaching or discussion - we learn by just reading from the author speaking  her own words.  It is important that students signing up for this class know that the rest of the course (8 weeks out of 10) involve a lot of data analysis and coding in either Python, R, or Matlab, and we read  interdisciplinary scientific literature with a strong emphasis on circulation and dynamics.

 

ESCI 497 Invasive Species Ecology and Management (2 Cr)

Angela Strecker

Winter

I’m still developing this class but intend on having a diverse reading list and discussing how some of the terminology used in this field (eg. alien, enemy) has some parallels with human culture (eg. war, xenophobia).  We’ll also discuss how different cultural practices can result in the release of species that may be ecologically damaging.

 

ESCI 501 Research in Environmental Science (3 Cr)

Angela Strecker

Fall

Minor focus on EID, mostly in terms of philosophy (who does science/STEM); discussions of barriers to broader inclusion and participation; research ethics (esp if students have social science elements to research).

 

ESCI 397L Riparian Conservation in the Grand Canyon (5 Cr)

John McLaughlin

not teaching it in 2021-22 but expect to in future

Indigenous roles/perspectives/identities/relationships in Grand Canyon; Indigenous responses to development proposals; Indigenous histories (past and ongoing) with Park Service; Indigenous co-management

 

ESCI 485/585 Global Change in the Cryosphere (5 Cr)

Alia Khan

Spring

Arctic Indigenous People - Role of POPs and biomagnification in the Arctic food chain, climate justice (permafrost degradation leading to coastal erosion in coastal communities; sea ice loss changing hunting habitat and access to food sources; sea level rise and flooding impacts in South Asia due to ice sheet melting; changes in water quantity and quality in snow and ice dominated watersheds).

 

ESCI 497I Climate Justice and Global Environmental Health  (4 Cr)

Alia Khan

Spring

This is a new course that I will teach for the first time next year. This will be a STEM focus on Global Environmental Health within the context of climate change. Here I'll bring in my own experience conducting research on water quality, sanitation and health in developing communities such as Bangladesh, Cambodia and Nepal.  Additionally, the impacts of a changing climate on these topics, as well as the basics of Epidemiology and digging into public health statistics on these topics. 

 

ENRG 101 Energy and Society (3 Cr)

Charles Barnhart

Fall, Winter, Summer

Energy Access, Externalities, Climate Risk and Vulnerability

 

ENRG 466 Life Cycle Analysis (4 Cr)

Charles Barnhart

Winter

Develops a holistic and intersectional yet still rigorously quantitative and physics based understanding of the harmful components (energy use, GHG, toxins) associated with societies goods and services.

 

ENRG 482 Greenhouse Gas Mitigation (4 Cr)

Charles Barnhart

Spring

Externalities, Financing, Disproportionate Harm Mitigation, Low-income solutions

 

ENRG 490 Energy Capstone: Energy Systems Synthesis (4 Cr)

Froylan Sifuentes

Winter

Engage students with energy projects EID components. Part of the assignment will be graded on the ability to make a case of how the project would contribute to EID goals in the community of interest.

 

UEPP 343 Urban Processes and Patterns (4 Cr)

James Miller

Spring

Topics include redlining, gentrification, systemic racism, oppression, anti-colonialism

 

UEPP 360 plan graphics and site planning (3 Cr)

Nicholas Zaferatos

Fall

This is primarily a computer design skills development course however we do introduce and apply City of Bellingham development policies and codes aimed at attaining greater equity and inclusiveness in urban development.

 

UEPP 463 Native American Planning and Natural Resources Policy (3 Cr)

Nicholas Zaferatos

Fall

Critical evaluation of federal Indian policy history and case law creating subjugating conditions faced by Native American political communities; political economy theories regarding mechanisms diminishing tribal political power and creating internal NA colonies; NA response movements; case studies of inclusionary policies reversing subjugation and building tribal political capacity in the management and control of reservation lands and treaty resources.

 

UEPP 473 Planning Studio II (6 Cr)

Nicholas Zaferatos

Winter

Varying emphasis on EID/E-SJ - depending on partnering community and their priorities. Applications of planning methods in achieving GMA goals. Project range from service to local municipalities to Native American communities.

 

UEPP 474 Planning for Sustainable Communities -- Capstone (4 Cr)

Nicholas Zaferatos

Spring

EID/E-SJ varies on project selection. Plan development applied studio. Most projects have focused on conditions of homelessness (locally and internationally) emphasizing design and policy strategies for integrated housing solutions in community development. Other projects address broader topics focused on inclusionary land use practices.