Thoughts & Doings

Huxley Environmental Career and Internship Fair

The annual Huxley Environmental Career and Internship Fair is set for Monday, 3 April 2017, from 4:30 to 6:30pm in the Viking Union Multi-Purpose Room. All majors are welcome. If you'd like to explore internships, summer jobs, and career-track positions with an environmental focus, then save this date.

We've already got a great line-up of participating organizations, from government agencies and nonprofits to consulting firms and private companies, and expect more to register between now and the event.

Questions? Contact Ed.Weber@wwu.edu or (360) 650-3646. See you there!

Participating Organizations

Huxley Speaker Series 2/23: Dr. Jon Riedel on the Status of Glaciers in Washington's National Parks

As part of the 2016-17 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Dr. Jon Riedel will deliver his talk, “Blue Ice: Photographic and Scientific Evidence of the Recent Loss of Glaciers in Washington's National Parks,” at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 23 in Miller Hall 138 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

The presentation will discuss the recent loss of glaciers in Washington’s National Parks. More than 500 glaciers grace the summits of Washington’s three National Parks. Aerial photographic evidence of their status was collected at various times in the last century, which has allowed for comparisons. Along with this data,... Continue reading

Huxley Speaker Series 2/16: Dr. Christine Biermann on the American Chestnut

As part of the 2016-17 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Christine Biermann will deliver her talk, “Securing Forests from the Scourge of Blight: Nature, Nation, and the American Chestnut,” at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 16 in Miller Hall 138 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

The presentation will examine how a range of human and non-human actors—from Appalachian farmers to rapidly-mutating viruses, and from biotech corporations to fungal pathogens—have shaped the American chestnut. Calling attention to the historical ties between nature and nation, Christine Biermann explores how... Continue reading

Huxley Speaker Series 2/9: Jim Lazar on the Transition to Renewable Energy

As part of the 2016-17 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Jim Lazar, a graduate of Huxley College, will deliver his talk, "Teaching the Duck to Fly:  Ten Strategies to Enable A High Reliance on Wind and Solar Energy for Electricity,"  at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 9 in Miller Hall 138 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

In recent years, wind and solar energy have become the least expensive resource options to meet the country’s electricity needs, but these resources are “variable” meaning they do not always produce electricity at predictable levels. Jim Lazar... Continue reading

Huxley Speaker Series 2/2: Alumni Speak on Environmental Careers

As part of the 2016-17 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, Huxley College alumni, Derek Koellmann, Christine Woodward, Rose Lathrop, and Bill Way will discuss their careers and the organizations they represent at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 2 in Miller Hall 138 on the Western Washington University campus. The panelists are from the following organizations:

  • Derek Koellmann, Anchor QEA
  • Christine Woodward, Samish Nation Tribal Government
  • Rose Lathrop, Sustainable Connections
  • Bill Way, The Watershed Company

The panelists represent a wide variety of environmental careers in areas such as natural resource management, environmental planning, green building and smart growth, environmental restoration, and policy development. All four of the panelists are graduates of Huxley College of the Environment.

The presentation will include a question-and-answer period. Anyone interested in the topic is encouraged to attend and participate.

For more information, please contact WWU’s Huxley... Continue reading

Graduate Student Thesis Funding - Huxley Small Grants Fall 2016

Each year, Huxley College provides a limited number of small grants to foster and facilitate graduate thesis research in environmental science and geography. In Fall 2016, the Graduate Program Committee awarded a total of $2,150 in support of graduate student thesis projects.

Click on a highlighted name to review the approved proposal:

  1. Cristina Villalobos
    Award amount: $1404
    Topic: How interaction of ocean warming and acidification will affect Pacific Herring embryology and make predictions of future herring populations.

  2. Mira Lutz
    Award amount: $746
    Topic: A search for Blue Carbon in temperate eelgrass meadows.

 

Huxley College's Urban Planning and Sustainable Development Program Awarded National Accreditation

Western has been granted national accreditation for its BA program in Urban Planning and Sustainable Development. The accreditation of undergraduate and graduate programs in the United States is granted by the Planning Accreditation Board in association with the American Planning Association, the American Institute of Certified Planners, and the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning. The granting of accreditation followed a three-year review effort involving the demonstration of compliance with 57 standards and criteria. Western now joins only fifteen other accredited undergraduate planning programs in the United States, and is the second accredited undergraduate planning program in Washington State.

Western has a long tradition in training students in the professional field of urban planning. Huxley College’s BA Degree Program in Urban Planning and Sustainable Development, and its predecessor BA programs in environmental planning and urban and regional planning, have continuously operated at... Continue reading

2016 T-shirt & Sweatshirt Sale During Dead Week in the ES Lobby

$5 off any sweatshirt in stock while supplies last!

Don’t miss our Huxley College T-shirt & sweatshirt sale, just in time for the holidays. We’ll be in the lobby of the Environmental Studies building (floor 1) on Tuesday 2-5pm, Wednesday 9am - 12:30pm, and Thursday 2-5pm. Stop by and pick up a Huxley hoodie or T-shirt. (NOTE: Cash, checks and credit cards accepted.)

Stock up now, and be sure to ask about our environmentally friendly products...

Huxley Speaker Series 12/1: David Shull on the Bering Sea Ecosystem

As part of the 2016-17 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, David Shull from Huxley's Department of Environmental Sciences will discuss the cycling of carbon and nutrients in Bering Sea sediments at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, December 1 in Miller Hall 138 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Located between the mostly ice-covered Arctic and the ice-free North Pacific Oceans, the Bering Sea is an incredibly productive ecosystem. This productivity is fueled by the seasonal availability of sunlight and nutrients, both of which are influenced by spring melt-back of sea ice. But the extent and timing of sea ice melt is changing as the region warms. Because the 500-km wide Bering Shelf is relatively shallow, biological and chemical processes in seafloor sediments likely play a significant role in the cycling of carbon and nutrients... Continue reading

Huxley Speaker Series 11/17: James Meacham on Wildlife GPS-collar Technology

As part of the 2016-17 Huxley College of the Environment Speaker Series, James Meacham from InfoGraphics Lab will discuss the use of GPS-collar technology to track wildlife in Yellowstone National Park at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 17 in Miller Hall 138 on the Western Washington University campus. The presentation is free and open to the public.

Wildlife GPS-collar technology provides wildlife ecologists an immense amount of data, giving new insight into animal migration. In his Speaker Series talk titled “Visualizing the Complexities of Wildlife Migration: Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Ungulates,” James Meacham will focus on the spatiotemporal data and cartographic design challenges encountered in the creation of thematic maps and data graphics for the Atlas of Wildlife Migration: Wyoming’s Ungulates. The recent discovery of the longest land mammal migration in the contiguous United States, the 150-mile “Red Desert... Continue reading

Pages

Subscribe to